1. August 25, 2014

    Crystal June Rome has opened up shop on Etsy, take a gander at some of her art here!

    Crystal June Rome has opened up shop on Etsy, take a gander at some of her art here!

  2. August 22, 2014

    Biomimicry Nature Walk Game event - it’s free and happening on Tuesday - and put on by Collaborative Design students! Learn more about the event here.

    Biomimicry Nature Walk Game event - it’s free and happening on Tuesday - and put on by Collaborative Design students! Learn more about the event here.

  3. August 20, 2014

    Great kickstarter by PNCA alumna, Gia Goodrich. She’s a talented photographer with a message! Click here to support her mission.

    Great kickstarter by PNCA alumna, Gia Goodrich. She’s a talented photographer with a message! Click here to support her mission.

  4. August 20, 2014

    Modified Style Portland: Youth Enrichment | Community Enhancement | Inspired Design
If you’re into clothing design, take a look at this awesome event happening on Sunday!

    Modified Style Portland: Youth Enrichment | Community Enhancement | Inspired Design

    If you’re into clothing design, take a look at this awesome event happening on Sunday!

  5. August 19, 2014

    We Love Clean Rivers
    From We Love Clean Rivers website

    We Love Clean Rivers | Artwork

    We Love Clean Rivers is a non-profit that’s been organizing river clean-up for over 10 years. Each year, thousands of pounds of trash are collected, and some of it is taken and made into beautiful art for auction. All of the proceeds from the auction go back to the cause. Alumna, Laura DeVito, is coordinating the artists this year - let’s clean some rivers and make some art!

    Go here to learn about making art for We Love Clean Rivers! River clean-up happens September 7 and October 5, 2014.

  6. August 14, 2014

    A little reading to get you ready for swift season - if you don’t know, thousands of swifts come to an elementary school in NW Portland while hundreds of people watch their descent into a chimney trying to avoid a hungry falcon.
Read here.Photo by David and Jackie Moreton

    A little reading to get you ready for swift season - if you don’t know, thousands of swifts come to an elementary school in NW Portland while hundreds of people watch their descent into a chimney trying to avoid a hungry falcon.

    Read here.
    Photo by David and Jackie Moreton

  7. August 13, 2014

    Alumnus, Jake Richardson, has been enjoying his summer and is returning to New York come September to work with Natalie Jeremijenko. Take a look at where he’s been already through his Process and Progress blog.

    Alumnus, Jake Richardson, has been enjoying his summer and is returning to New York come September to work with Natalie Jeremijenko. Take a look at where he’s been already through his Process and Progress blog.

  8. August 11, 2014

    Alumna, Halley Roberts, captures colors in nature. She is the Co-Director of Westerlind in San Francisco which is aptly described as “an intersection of where technical outdoor gear and apparel meet a style-minded boutique.”

    Alumna, Halley Roberts, captures colors in nature. She is the Co-Director of Westerlind in San Francisco which is aptly described as “an intersection of where technical outdoor gear and apparel meet a style-minded boutique.”

  9. August 07, 2014

    
INTERVIEW WITH LAUREN SCHAEFER ON FLOAT ON AND HATCH
Alumna, Lauren Schaefer, gives personal insights into the world of small business and social entrepreneurship.
Can you tell me a about what you’re doing now?I am a sensory deprivation specialist at Float On (in Portland, Oregon), which is the largest sensory deprivation float tank center in the US. It is much more than the shop though- we have a publishing company, record label, and a consulting company. My role ranges from the basic shop duties, such as tank chemistry, deep cleans and member services to program development, marketing and graphic design. I am working on developing a program, which highlights the physical benefits of sensory deprivation. I’ve also been helping with the preparation of the Float Conference, which is the largest in the world and happening this weekend right here in Portland.
Are there connections between your capstone and your current work?I am learning about small business and entrepreneurship. Interestingly enough, I actually met a couple of the owners from Float On through CAKE (Consulting and Knowledge Exchange), which was one of the resources in the book I created for my capstone, Access PDX. I met them during my thesis and here I am working for them now. Float On strives to be as local and sustainable as possible. Both of these values influenced my capstone. Although, it was not an A to B track getting here, I feel that I’m very satisfied in the position, because it allows me to pursue my interests and develop new talents. I also am working with Hatch, which feeds my interest in social entrepreneurship.
I work with Hatch to help run Soup, which is an international model for micro-grant fundraising events. People come to Soup to pitch their community good ideas to Hatch and the Portland community. It brings people together, by having them pay a little bit of money, eat food from local businesses and listen to inspired projects. There is a real sense of community at Soup. Actually, I met one of our recent presenters while in the Collaborative Design program when we were making Blight Magazine. His nonprofit, SCAFE, helps reduce recidivism for those transitioning out of incarceration. Now he is launching a food cart to employ people and teach them about running a small business. His project ended up winning and he received about $500 to assist his project.
What advice would you give to students about to embark on a career in Collaborative Design?Get out while you still can (laughing)! I would say don’t let your expectations rule what you do. You may care about urban planning, and you may end up remotely in urban planning, but you may also end up in some avant-garde theatre in Omaha, Nebraska, because that’s just what happens. I think it’s going to save you a lot of stress to let things happen and adapt. 
How do you maintain your creative practice?Lately, it’s been floating. I go into my floats trying to think about my creative work. This is also sort of difficult because you can’t control the float experience – and you wont have an optimal float if you try to control it. Sometimes though, I can have epiphanies (Thanks, Don!) about what I’m going to paint afterwards or ideas for design fiction projects.  Intensely creative experiences can come out of a floating.
What keeps you motivated and engaged?I’ve been motivated by witnessing the successes at Hatch. Also, I keep engaged by seeing all the enthusiasm of everyone at Float On. Their story about how it all came to be is chaotic and awesome. Despite the stresses of running a small business, they are relaxed, positive and incredibly encouraging people. Who wouldn’t be when you spend all your time at a float tank center? Despite the fact that I am often considered a cynic and a curmudgeon, I’m definitely motivated by the positive vibe of where I am now. Recently, I have been thinking that the best way to help save the world is by starting with maintaining your own wellness. I am in the right place for that. 
Can you describe a moment or experience that profoundly changed your work?In Portland, I feel encouraged to practice art and design that is outside the realm of what people expect to consume on a regular basis – like design fiction. I love design fiction. You can just imagine what would happen for the future of cars, clothing, grocery stores, etc. and execute a small project or a whole world around it. It allows me to use both my intuitive creative powers and more regimented research abilities to develop work.  
Do you have any final thoughts?Come float and come to a Soup event! The Float Conference is this weekend, so check that out too.
Also, one of my favorite ideas about Float On is the permission to do nothing. People think they’re relaxing by zoning out to Netflix or planning a camping trip, but that’s not doing nothing. Most people cannot actually conceive the idea of nothing. Depriving your senses of information is an experience unlike any other. We like to say we sell people nothing - that we’re in the business of nothing, and that’s such a radical idea in our time and age. So float on, and try nothing.

    INTERVIEW WITH LAUREN SCHAEFER ON FLOAT ON AND HATCH

    Alumna, Lauren Schaefer, gives personal insights into the world of small business and social entrepreneurship.

    Can you tell me a about what you’re doing now?
    I am a sensory deprivation specialist at Float On (in Portland, Oregon), which is the largest sensory deprivation float tank center in the US. It is much more than the shop though- we have a publishing company, record label, and a consulting company. My role ranges from the basic shop duties, such as tank chemistry, deep cleans and member services to program development, marketing and graphic design. I am working on developing a program, which highlights the physical benefits of sensory deprivation. I’ve also been helping with the preparation of the Float Conference, which is the largest in the world and happening this weekend right here in Portland.

    Are there connections between your capstone and your current work?
    I am learning about small business and entrepreneurship. Interestingly enough, I actually met a couple of the owners from Float On through CAKE (Consulting and Knowledge Exchange), which was one of the resources in the book I created for my capstone, Access PDX. I met them during my thesis and here I am working for them now. Float On strives to be as local and sustainable as possible. Both of these values influenced my capstone. Although, it was not an A to B track getting here, I feel that I’m very satisfied in the position, because it allows me to pursue my interests and develop new talents. I also am working with Hatch, which feeds my interest in social entrepreneurship.

    I work with Hatch to help run Soup, which is an international model for micro-grant fundraising events. People come to Soup to pitch their community good ideas to Hatch and the Portland community. It brings people together, by having them pay a little bit of money, eat food from local businesses and listen to inspired projects. There is a real sense of community at Soup. Actually, I met one of our recent presenters while in the Collaborative Design program when we were making Blight Magazine. His nonprofit, SCAFE, helps reduce recidivism for those transitioning out of incarceration. Now he is launching a food cart to employ people and teach them about running a small business. His project ended up winning and he received about $500 to assist his project.

    What advice would you give to students about to embark on a career in Collaborative Design?
    Get out while you still can (laughing)! I would say don’t let your expectations rule what you do. You may care about urban planning, and you may end up remotely in urban planning, but you may also end up in some avant-garde theatre in Omaha, Nebraska, because that’s just what happens. I think it’s going to save you a lot of stress to let things happen and adapt. 

    How do you maintain your creative practice?
    Lately, it’s been floating. I go into my floats trying to think about my creative work. This is also sort of difficult because you can’t control the float experience – and you wont have an optimal float if you try to control it. Sometimes though, I can have epiphanies (Thanks, Don!) about what I’m going to paint afterwards or ideas for design fiction projects.  Intensely creative experiences can come out of a floating.

    What keeps you motivated and engaged?
    I’ve been motivated by witnessing the successes at Hatch. Also, I keep engaged by seeing all the enthusiasm of everyone at Float On. Their story about how it all came to be is chaotic and awesome. Despite the stresses of running a small business, they are relaxed, positive and incredibly encouraging people. Who wouldn’t be when you spend all your time at a float tank center? Despite the fact that I am often considered a cynic and a curmudgeon, I’m definitely motivated by the positive vibe of where I am now. Recently, I have been thinking that the best way to help save the world is by starting with maintaining your own wellness. I am in the right place for that. 

    Can you describe a moment or experience that profoundly changed your work?
    In Portland, I feel encouraged to practice art and design that is outside the realm of what people expect to consume on a regular basis – like design fiction. I love design fiction. You can just imagine what would happen for the future of cars, clothing, grocery stores, etc. and execute a small project or a whole world around it. It allows me to use both my intuitive creative powers and more regimented research abilities to develop work.  

    Do you have any final thoughts?
    Come float and come to a Soup event! The Float Conference is this weekend, so check that out too.

    Also, one of my favorite ideas about Float On is the permission to do nothing. People think they’re relaxing by zoning out to Netflix or planning a camping trip, but that’s not doing nothing. Most people cannot actually conceive the idea of nothing. Depriving your senses of information is an experience unlike any other. We like to say we sell people nothing - that we’re in the business of nothing, and that’s such a radical idea in our time and age. So float on, and try nothing.

  10. August 01, 2014

    Marina Zurkow, Collaborative Design Research Fellow, is inviting people to take a ride on the Floating Studio for Dark Ecologies. Field trips are held August 1st through 3rd, 2014. 
If interested in participating in any of these field trips, please RSVP. You can do this by visiting the website here.
AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 3, 2014: 
Floating Studio for Dark EcologiesInvites you to participate in 3 FSDE Field Trips the first weekend in August, co-hosted by The Nomadic Dept of the Interior (NDOI). 
Friday Aug 1, 20144pm – 8pmThe Jakob von Uexküll Memorial “If You See It, Be It” Kayak Tripwith Oliver Kellhammer & Marina Zurkow
Saturday Aug 2, 201410 am – 6 pmDesign with Non-Human CollaboratorsCharrette: Using Bioremediating Allies in Architecture, Art and Design
Sunday Aug 3, 201410:30 am – 1:00 pmThe Mighty Mendel Botanical Scavenger Hunt A Plant Walk in Willamette Cove withOliver Kellhammer & Marina Zurkow

    Marina Zurkow, Collaborative Design Research Fellow, is inviting people to take a ride on the Floating Studio for Dark Ecologies. Field trips are held August 1st through 3rd, 2014. 

    If interested in participating in any of these field trips, please RSVP. You can do this by visiting the website here.

    AUGUST 1 - AUGUST 3, 2014: 

    Floating Studio for Dark Ecologies
    Invites you to participate in 3 FSDE Field Trips the first weekend in August, co-hosted by The Nomadic Dept of the Interior (NDOI)

    Friday Aug 1, 2014
    4pm – 8pm
    The Jakob von Uexküll Memorial “If You See It, Be It” Kayak Trip
    with Oliver Kellhammer & Marina Zurkow

    Saturday Aug 2, 2014
    10 am – 6 pm
    Design with Non-Human Collaborators
    Charrette: Using Bioremediating Allies in Architecture, Art and Design

    Sunday Aug 3, 2014
    10:30 am – 1:00 pm
    The Mighty Mendel Botanical Scavenger Hunt 
    A Plant Walk in Willamette Cove withOliver Kellhammer & Marina Zurkow